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This Many Americans Consider Themselves a Foodie

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This Many Americans Consider Themselves a Foodie

This Many Americans Consider Themselves a Foodie

More than half of Americans (53%) consider themselves to be foodies, according to new research.

A study of 2,000 Americans examined the rise of the foodie trend phenomenon and found that 62 percent would go to an event just for the food.

The study, conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Eventbrite, examined the lengths to which people are willing to go when it comes to trendy foods.

It turns out that food plays a major role in helping Americans decide whether or not to attend an event or social gathering.

Seventy-seven percent say food is important when attending any public event.

And food is the second top consideration for people when choosing which events to attend, ranking above the quality of the performers or speakers and who else is attending.

With food being top of mind for Americans, it's no wonder that 66 percent remember a bad meal they've had at an event -- with 56 percent revealing they would never be willing to go back to an event that served bad food.

On the other hand, 80 percent say they're more likely to go back to an event that served good food.

In fact, a whopping 74 percent would make sure to show up to an event if they knew the food served was going to be good.

Sixty-six percent revealed they would make sure to arrive early to an event if they thought the food might run out early -- with the average early arrival coming in at more than 25 minutes prior to the actual start time.

When it comes to the types of food-related events Americans are interested in attending, over half (52 percent) reported they enjoy attending food festivals where they can try many types of food while a further 46 percent enjoy a food truck gathering as a way to get a taste of different foods.

Forty-four percent say they usually discover new foods and restaurants at events and festivals.

Adele Maynes, Head of Anthropological Research for Eventbrite, stated: "Food has been a powerful cultural connector for decades.

Now, we're seeing a focus on trying delicious, unique foods at events of all kinds.

Whether at a bustling food festival or an intimate pop-up chef's dinner, foodies are seeking out experiences they can share with their friends and family." For Americans, food is a community affair.

Fifty-five percent say their friends look to them for food recommendations, and 44 percent definitely prefer trying new foods with their community instead of eating alone.

How far are people willing to go to try new foods?

Eighty-four percent of Americans are willing to wait up to an hour and a half to try the latest food trend.

A majority (60 percent) said they would put up with a long line for food to try something new.

Other reasons for standing in long lines to get their hands on the trendiest treats include out of curiosity (54 percent), simply because they want to eat it (44 percent), and to share the experience with friends and family (37 percent).

However, standing in line isn't always worth it when it comes to trendy food.

Nearly half (48 percent) of those surveyed revealed that they have been disappointed by a trendy treat after waiting in line.

For some, waiting in line is worth it for the photos they can share online.

Fifty-five percent of those surveyed have taken a picture of their food -- with a quarter (26 percent) also posting a food photo on social media in the last month.

45 percent reveal that their food actually tastes better after they've taken a picture of it.

Adele Maynes, Head of Anthropological Research for Eventbrite, stated: "Foodies have risen the bar at all types of experiences.

It's not just the food festivals that people expect delectable bites at.

From conferences to half marathons, food and drink is a part of the package now.

The events that surprise and delight their attendees with unique flavors and combinations will see the most success in the years to come." Americans are opening their horizons -- and mouths.

Forty-eight percent of those studied have tried or want to try bee pollen.

Thirty-seven percent have already tried or want to try coffee beer while a further 34 percent have tried or want to try drinking collagen.

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This Many Americans Consider Themselves a Foodie

More than half of Americans (53%) consider themselves to be foodies, according to new research.

A study of 2,000 Americans examined the rise of the foodie trend phenomenon and found that 62 percent would go to an event just for the food.

The study, conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Eventbrite, examined the lengths to which people are willing to go when it comes to trendy foods.

It turns out that food plays a major role in helping Americans decide whether or not to attend an event or social gathering.

Seventy-seven percent say food is important when attending any public event.

And food is the second top consideration for people when choosing which events to attend, ranking above the quality of the performers or speakers and who else is attending.

With food being top of mind for Americans, it's no wonder that 66 percent remember a bad meal they've had at an event -- with 56 percent revealing they would never be willing to go back to an event that served bad food.

On the other hand, 80 percent say they're more likely to go back to an event that served good food.

In fact, a whopping 74 percent would make sure to show up to an event if they knew the food served was going to be good.

Sixty-six percent revealed they would make sure to arrive early to an event if they thought the food might run out early -- with the average early arrival coming in at more than 25 minutes prior to the actual start time.

When it comes to the types of food-related events Americans are interested in attending, over half (52 percent) reported they enjoy attending food festivals where they can try many types of food while a further 46 percent enjoy a food truck gathering as a way to get a taste of different foods.

Forty-four percent say they usually discover new foods and restaurants at events and festivals.

Adele Maynes, Head of Anthropological Research for Eventbrite, stated: "Food has been a powerful cultural connector for decades.

Now, we're seeing a focus on trying delicious, unique foods at events of all kinds.

Whether at a bustling food festival or an intimate pop-up chef's dinner, foodies are seeking out experiences they can share with their friends and family." For Americans, food is a community affair.

Fifty-five percent say their friends look to them for food recommendations, and 44 percent definitely prefer trying new foods with their community instead of eating alone.

How far are people willing to go to try new foods?

Eighty-four percent of Americans are willing to wait up to an hour and a half to try the latest food trend.

A majority (60 percent) said they would put up with a long line for food to try something new.

Other reasons for standing in long lines to get their hands on the trendiest treats include out of curiosity (54 percent), simply because they want to eat it (44 percent), and to share the experience with friends and family (37 percent).

However, standing in line isn't always worth it when it comes to trendy food.

Nearly half (48 percent) of those surveyed revealed that they have been disappointed by a trendy treat after waiting in line.

For some, waiting in line is worth it for the photos they can share online.

Fifty-five percent of those surveyed have taken a picture of their food -- with a quarter (26 percent) also posting a food photo on social media in the last month.

45 percent reveal that their food actually tastes better after they've taken a picture of it.

Adele Maynes, Head of Anthropological Research for Eventbrite, stated: "Foodies have risen the bar at all types of experiences.

It's not just the food festivals that people expect delectable bites at.

From conferences to half marathons, food and drink is a part of the package now.

The events that surprise and delight their attendees with unique flavors and combinations will see the most success in the years to come." Americans are opening their horizons -- and mouths.

Forty-eight percent of those studied have tried or want to try bee pollen.

Thirty-seven percent have already tried or want to try coffee beer while a further 34 percent have tried or want to try drinking collagen.




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