India  

Scientists Look at Why It Can Be So Hard For People to Learn a New Language

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
Scientists Look at Why It Can Be So Hard For People to Learn a New Language

Scientists Look at Why It Can Be So Hard For People to Learn a New Language

Scientists Look at Why It Can Be So Hard, For People to Learn a New Language.

The brain lives in a state of constant flux, making adjustments to juggle millions of incoming signals.

.

CNET reports that scientists say that is precisely what makes it so difficult for adults to learn new languages.

Brain cell activity can be divided into two categories -- plasticity and stability.

Brain cell activity can be divided into two categories -- plasticity and stability.

Plasticity refers to the brain's ability to change.

Stability is the opposite; it allows the brain to hold on to things we've already learned.

Plasticity refers to the brain's ability to change.

Stability is the opposite; it allows the brain to hold on to things we've already learned.

Younger children have a high level of "neural plasticity." But as we get older, the brain's neural plasticity goes down.

Younger children have a high level of "neural plasticity." But as we get older, the brain's neural plasticity goes down.

According to new research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, when learning a new language, humans rely on plasticity.

That's why children can often learn multiple languages, while adults tend to struggle when learning a new language.

The brain starts to prioritize stability.

We basically want to hang on to the important stuff that we've spent the last decade or more learning.

Researchers found that our brains are more likely to pick up familiar sounds.

That's another reason surrounding ourselves with a language is often more effective than formal lessons.

It all has to do with training our brains to recognize patterns and engage our neurons


You Might Like