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Vaccine Expert: Everyone on FDA panel would vaccinate their own child

Video Credit: Bleacher Report AOL - Duration: 10:12s - Published
Vaccine Expert: Everyone on FDA panel would vaccinate their own child

Vaccine Expert: Everyone on FDA panel would vaccinate their own child

Dr. Paul Offit, pediatrician, vaccine pioneer and author of “You Bet Your Life,” explains the risk inherent in every major medical breakthrough


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2nd At-Home Rapid COVID Test Is Authorized by the FDA [Video]

2nd At-Home Rapid COVID Test Is Authorized by the FDA

2nd At-Home Rapid COVID Test , Is Authorized by the FDA. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced its authorization on Dec. 28. The test was designed by Siemens Healthineers and can now be used in addition to the Roche test the FDA also recently approved. The authorization comes as test shortages have wracked the nation amid record-breaking numbers of infections. Officials with the Biden administration praised the FDA's move as in keeping with its COVID priorities. Increasing Americans' access to easy-to-use, reliable COVID tests is a top priority for the Biden Administration, , Xavier Becerra, Health and Human Services Secretary, via 'The Hill'. ... and we are using all resources at our disposal to make more tests available and ramp up supply, Xavier Becerra, Health and Human Services Secretary, via 'The Hill'. With daily infections topping 300,000 in the U.S., at-home testing has become a signature administration strategy. Adding two new authorized tests will give Americans more options for testing at home, , Xavier Becerra, Health and Human Services Secretary, via 'The Hill'. ... which helps keep people safe and provides peace of mind, Xavier Becerra, Health and Human Services Secretary, via 'The Hill'. FDA officials cautioned that the at-home test is not 100 percent accurate. Negative results do not rule out SARS-CoV-2 infection and should not be used as the sole basis for treatment or patient management decisions, including infection control decisions. , Jacqueline A. O’Shaughnessy, FDA Scientist, via 'The Hill'. Despite this, the tests offer reliable guidance in the context of a person's potential exposure to COVID-19. Negative results should be considered in the context of an individual’s recent exposures, history and the presence of clinical signs and symptoms consistent with COVID-19, Jacqueline A. O’Shaughnessy, FDA Scientist, via 'The Hill'. The Biden administration is expected to begin distribution of 500 million at-home tests sometime in January

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
COVID-19 Pills May Conflict With Certain Medications, Study Finds [Video]

COVID-19 Pills May Conflict With Certain Medications, Study Finds

COVID-19 Pills May Conflict With , Certain Medications, Study Finds. NBC News reports experts are warning anti-viral pills created by Pfizer and Merck may not be safe for everyone. Recently cleared by the Food and Drug Administration to treat infections in patients 12 and older, anti-viral pills have been a cause for optimism in the fight against COVID-19. According to NBC News, experts have found that certain ingredients in the anti-viral pills may cause extreme reactions when paired with more widely-used medications. Oddly enough, many of the affected medications are widely prescribed to those with the highest risk of developing COVID-19 complications. Oddly enough, many of the affected medications are widely prescribed to those with the highest risk of developing COVID-19 complications. These medications include antidepressants, immunosuppressants and even inhalers. These medications include antidepressants, immunosuppressants and even inhalers. Some of these potential interactions are not trivial, and some pairings have to be avoided altogether. , Peter Anderson, professor of pharmaceutical science, University of Colorado, via NBC News. Some of these potential interactions are not trivial, and some pairings have to be avoided altogether. , Peter Anderson, professor of pharmaceutical science, University of Colorado, via NBC News. Some are probably easily managed. But some we’re going to have to be very careful about. , Peter Anderson, professor of pharmaceutical science, University of Colorado, via NBC News. Some are probably easily managed. But some we’re going to have to be very careful about. , Peter Anderson, professor of pharmaceutical science, University of Colorado, via NBC News. Amid concerns, experts remain excited by the potential of anti-viral pills. This could make a real difference in the pandemic by making an effective Covid treatment available to many people. , Peter Anderson, professor of pharmaceutical science, University of Colorado, via NBC News. This could make a real difference in the pandemic by making an effective Covid treatment available to many people. , Peter Anderson, professor of pharmaceutical science, University of Colorado, via NBC News

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published
Pfizer's Antiviral COVID-19 Pill Authorized by FDA [Video]

Pfizer's Antiviral COVID-19 Pill Authorized by FDA

Pfizer's Antiviral COVID-19 Pill , Authorized by FDA. NPR reports the Food and Drug Administration has officially authorized the first COVID-19 antiviral pill. The pill, Paxlovid, was created by pharmaceutical company Pfizer. Experts say Pfizer's pill could keep those infected with COVID-19 from becoming ill enough to require hospitalization. . Experts say Pfizer's pill could keep those infected with COVID-19 from becoming ill enough to require hospitalization. . According to NPR, the pill is meant to be ingested twice a day for five days. Paxlovid will reportedly require a tandem dose of generic antiviral medicine ritonavir. Today's authorization introduces the first treatment for COVID-19 that is in the form of a pill — a major step forward in the fight against this global pandemic. , Dr. Patrizia Cavazzoni, director of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, via NPR. Today's authorization introduces the first treatment for COVID-19 that is in the form of a pill — a major step forward in the fight against this global pandemic. , Dr. Patrizia Cavazzoni, director of the FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, via NPR. Pfizer's studies suggest taking Paxlovid within three days of exhibiting symptoms could reduce the risk of death and hospitalization by 89%. Pfizer's studies suggest taking Paxlovid within three days of exhibiting symptoms could reduce the risk of death and hospitalization by 89%. NPR reports separate studies showed the pill only reduced 70% of hospitalizations. Experts say the effectiveness of Paxlovid shouldn't diminish when treating Omicron-related infections. The United States will reportedly purchase 10 million courses of Pfizer's new COVID-19 treatment. Pfizer says around 180,000 courses of treatment will be available by the end of the year

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published
FDA Approves First Injectable HIV PrEP Drug [Video]

FDA Approves First Injectable HIV PrEP Drug

FDA Approves First , Injectable HIV PrEP Drug. On Dec. 20, the FDA approved a new drug called Apretude. It is used as pre-exposure prevention (PrEP) against HIV. The long-acting injectable medication is the first of its kind. Apretude is given every two months as opposed to pills like Truvada and Descovy, which are taken daily. FDA trials also found the injection to be more effective than the pills in reducing HIV infection. . FDA trials also found the injection to be more effective than the pills in reducing HIV infection. . Today’s approval adds an important tool in the effort to end the HIV epidemic by providing the first option to prevent HIV that does not involve taking a daily pill, Dr. Debra Birnkrant, the director of antivirals division at the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, via statement. This injection, given every two months, will be critical to addressing the HIV epidemic in the U.S., including helping high-risk individuals and certain groups where adherence to daily medication has been a major challenge or not a realistic option, Dr. Debra Birnkrant, the director of antivirals division at the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, via statement. According to the CDC, last year, only 25% of the estimated 1.2 million people PrEP is recommended for were prescribed treatment. Advocates hope the new injectable option will increase PrEP usage and lower HIV infections

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published
FDA Makes Abortion Pills Permanently Available via Mail [Video]

FDA Makes Abortion Pills Permanently Available via Mail

FDA Makes Abortion Pills , Permanently Available via Mail. On December 17, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) permanently lifted restrictions on access to abortion pills. . On December 17, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) permanently lifted restrictions on access to abortion pills. . 'The New York Times' reports that patients will now be able to receive the medication by mail, rather than obtaining it in person from certified health care providers. . The decision was announced as the Supreme Court weighs rolling back abortion rights or even overturning Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide. . Patients can now receive a prescription for abortion pills through a telemedicine appointment. . Earlier this year, the FDA temporarily made mifepristone, one of two drugs used to terminate a pregnancy, available by mail. . The new decision makes that ruling permanent. . According to the 'NYT,' the decision is likely to further polarize divisions between conservative and liberal states. 19 states currently ban patients from receiving abortion pills through telemedicine visits. . Other state, like New York and California, are expected to provide access for women in more restrictive states to obtain abortion medication. . It’s really significant. Telehealth abortions are much easier for both providers and patients, and even in states that want to do it, there have been limits on how available it is, Mary Ziegler, a law professor at Florida State University, via 'The New York Times'

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published