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Surging COVID-19 Infections Lead to School Closures in the United States

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:30s - Published
Surging COVID-19 Infections Lead to School Closures in the United States

Surging COVID-19 Infections Lead to School Closures in the United States

Surging COVID-19 Infections Lead, to School Closures in the United States.

Surging COVID-19 Infections Lead, to School Closures in the United States.

'The Guardian' reports a surge in COVID-19 infections has led some school districts in the United States to close their doors once again.

'The Guardian' reports a surge in COVID-19 infections has led some school districts in the United States to close their doors once again.

Rising pediatric cases of COVID-19 have convinced officials in Maryland, New Mexico, New Jersey and New York to return to remote learning.

Rising pediatric cases of COVID-19 have convinced officials in Maryland, New Mexico, New Jersey and New York to return to remote learning.

I have been very reluctant to close schools but given the current trends in Covid cases, it would be risky not to do so.

, Kenneth Hamilton, district superintendent, New York, via 'The Guardian'.

I have been very reluctant to close schools but given the current trends in Covid cases, it would be risky not to do so.

, Kenneth Hamilton, district superintendent, New York, via 'The Guardian'.

As the Omicron variant continues to spread around the country, some education officials are frustrated they have to once again resort to remote education.

As the Omicron variant continues to spread around the country, some education officials are frustrated they have to once again resort to remote education.

Just when we thought... that things were moving in the right direction... , Dan Domenech, director of the School Superintendents Association, via 'Newsweek'.

Just when we thought... that things were moving in the right direction... , Dan Domenech, director of the School Superintendents Association, via 'Newsweek'.

... here we are right back where we were last year.

, Dan Domenech, director of the School Superintendents Association, via 'Newsweek'.

... here we are right back where we were last year.

, Dan Domenech, director of the School Superintendents Association, via 'Newsweek'.

Some health experts question the need for closing schools at all.

We know that for kids being in school is the right thing for them, for their mental health, for their education.

, Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University School of Public Health, via 'The Guardian'.

We know that for kids being in school is the right thing for them, for their mental health, for their education.

, Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University School of Public Health, via 'The Guardian'.

We have all sorts of tools to keep schools open so I don’t really understand why school districts are [closing schools].

, Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University School of Public Health, via 'The Guardian'.

We have all sorts of tools to keep schools open so I don’t really understand why school districts are [closing schools].

, Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University School of Public Health, via 'The Guardian'


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