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Maternal Mortality Rate Expected to Rise in Wake of SCOTUS Ruling

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
Maternal Mortality Rate Expected to Rise in Wake of SCOTUS Ruling

Maternal Mortality Rate Expected to Rise in Wake of SCOTUS Ruling

Maternal Mortality Rate Expected to Rise, in Wake of SCOTUS Ruling.

Researchers and scholars urge legislative and voter action following the ruling that overturned 'Roe v.

Wade.'.

There are going to be more people who are forced to carry a pregnancy to term, which means that there’s going to be a greater number of people who are at risk, Professor Rachel Hardeman, University of Minnesota, via 'The Guardian'.

Scholars also say that maternal mortality rates will be disproportionate among women of color.

The truth of the matter is, it’s already hitting people [of color] harder than others – that’s been the reality, Dr. Monica McLemore, University of California, San Francisco, via 'The Guardian'.

Because Black, Indigenous, and Latinx communities are going to be disproportionately impacted by lack of access to abortion services, , Professor Rachel Hardeman, University of Minnesota, via 'The Guardian'.

... it’s going to exacerbate the maternal mortality racial gap that we’ve already seen in the United States, Professor Rachel Hardeman, University of Minnesota, via 'The Guardian'.

It’s translating into not getting the care they need, which can be a matter of life and death, Professor Rachel Hardeman, University of Minnesota, via 'The Guardian'.

Scholars say it may be useful to think of the Dobbs v.

Jackson Women's Health decision as racist.

We have to be thinking about the SCOTUS decision and abortion bans generally as a racist policy, Professor Rachel Hardeman, University of Minnesota, via 'The Guardian'.

The burden will fall the hardest on Black pregnant people, it’s going to fall hard on Indigenous people and other people of color, people living in rural areas as well and people of lower socioeconomic status, Professor Rachel Hardeman, University of Minnesota, via 'The Guardian'.

If you think about why people get abortions, it’s often because it’s not safe for them to stay pregnant, Dr. Amanda Jean Stevenson, University of Colorado Boulder, via 'The Guardian'.

Scholars agree that it's up to voters to elect a Congress that will prioritize reproductive rights at the federal level.

They say that such action will prevent deaths of pregnant women.

We need an all-hands-on-deck approach here – with brilliance, not fear, Dr. Monica McLemore, University of California, San Francisco, via 'The Guardian'


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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published

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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published