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Monkeypox Vaccines Will Soon Be Available in States With High Rates

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:30s - Published
Monkeypox Vaccines Will Soon Be Available in States With High Rates

Monkeypox Vaccines Will Soon Be Available in States With High Rates

Monkeypox Vaccines Will Soon Be Available, in States With High Rates.

Enhanced measures aimed at curtailing the spread of monkeypox were announced by the Biden administration on June 28.

According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky.

... the allocation will focus on men who have sex with men and those who may have been exposed anonymously.

Vaccination after exposure, or using vaccines for post-exposure prophylaxis, is meant to reduce your risk of becoming infected with a monkeypox virus and then become sick.

, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, CDC Director, via CNN.

Vaccination should occur within two weeks of a possible exposure.

, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, CDC Director, via CNN.

And the sooner you can get vaccinated after the exposure, the better, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, CDC Director, via CNN.

There are currently just over 300 reported cases of monkeypox in the U.S., but experts say the actual number is much higher.

The vaccine rollout may hit some snags, as there are fewer doses of the newer Jynneos vaccine available.

Health professionals say the older vaccine, ACAM, requires training to administer and is not safe for those who have HIV.

It's critical that we get vaccine out to the at-risk population and approach, vaccine use much as we've approached the pre exposure prophylaxis for HIV, Dr. Michael Osterholm, University of Minnesota, via CNN.

1.25 million more doses of the Jynneos vaccine will soon be available.

As soon as we have more vaccines available, we will of course continue to expand from a post-exposure prophylaxis strategy, ideally to a pre-exposure prophylaxis strategy, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, CDC Director, via CNN


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