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Study Reveals The Toll On Mental Health Pandemic Took On Italian Healthcare Workers

Video Credit: Wochit News - Duration: 00:36s - Published
Study Reveals The Toll On Mental Health Pandemic Took On Italian Healthcare Workers

Study Reveals The Toll On Mental Health Pandemic Took On Italian Healthcare Workers

Italy was extremely hard hit by the novel coronavirus COVID-19, early on in the global pandemic.

According to UPI, a new study shows Italian frontline healthcare workers treating COVID-19 patients were hard hit as well.

Nearly half of them have experienced symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder during the outbreak there.

Almost 25% suffered from depression and roughly 20% reported symptoms of anxiety as the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, continued to spread.

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