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The Flu May Increase Risk of Developing Parkinson’s Disease by Up to 90%, Study Says

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:30s - Published
The Flu May Increase Risk of Developing Parkinson’s Disease by Up to 90%, Study Says

The Flu May Increase Risk of Developing Parkinson’s Disease by Up to 90%, Study Says

The Flu May Increase Risk of Developing Parkinson’s Disease , by Up to 90%, Study Says.

Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder.

It negatively affects one's ability to control motor function.

According to the Parkinson's Foundation, nearly one million Americans are affected by the disease.

A study recently published in 'JAMA Neurology' may have found a link between flu infections and Parkinson's.

A study recently published in 'JAMA Neurology' may have found a link between flu infections and Parkinson's.

'The New York Times' reports researchers analyzed Danish healthcare databases and tracked flu infections dating back to 1977 to reach this conclusion.

The study found that those who had dealt with the flu at any point ended up having a 70% higher chance of contracting Parkinson's disease within ten years.

Within 15 years, that number rose to 90%.

The association may not be unique to influenza, but it's the infection that has gotten the most attention.

, Noelle M.

Cocoros, research scientist, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, via 'The New York Times'.

Experts say the study adds to the theory that inflammation from infections like the flu have an ill effect on the central nervous system.

Researchers say they have yet to find a definite link between the flu and Parkinson's.

We've couched our findings with appropriate limitations.

, Noelle M.

Cocoros, research scientist, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, via 'The New York Times'.

Our study adds to a broader literature, and we shouldn't overstate the results.

, Noelle M.

Cocoros, research scientist, Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, via 'The New York Times'


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