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EPA Takes Aim at US Chemical Emissions That Are Likely Carcinogens

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
EPA Takes Aim at US Chemical Emissions That Are Likely Carcinogens

EPA Takes Aim at US Chemical Emissions That Are Likely Carcinogens

EPA Takes Aim at, US Chemical Emissions, That Are Likely Carcinogens.

'The Independent' reports that over 200 chemical plants in the United States will be required to reduce toxic emissions under a new rule.

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The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the new rule regarding toxic emissions likely to cause cancer on April 9.

The rule is meant to deliver critical health protections for communities faced with industrial pollution from dangerous chemicals, such as chloroprene and ethyl oxide.

The rule will significantly reduce emissions from the Denka Performance Elastomer facility in LaPlace, Louisiana.

The facility is the largest producer of chloroprene emissions in the U.S., according to EPA Administrator Michael Regan.

Every community in this country deserves to breathe clean air.

That’s why I took the Journey to Justice tour to communities like St.

John the Baptist Parish, where residents have borne the brunt of toxic air for far too long, Michael Regan, EPA Administrator, via 'The Independent'.

We promised to listen to folks that are suffering from pollution and act to protect them.

Today we deliver on that promise with strong final standards to slash pollution, reduce cancer risk and ensure cleaner air for nearby communities, Michael Regan, EPA Administrator, via 'The Independent'.

According to officials, the changes are meant to reduce ethylene oxide and chloroprene emissions in the U.S. by nearly 80%.

'The Independent' reports that the rule updates several regulations on chemical plant emissions that have not been altered in nearly 20 years.

The EPA said that the new rule will reduce a total of over 6,200 tons of toxic air pollutants annually in an effort to address health risks in neighboring communities


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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
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Credit: FRANCE 24 English    Duration: 01:49Published
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