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Men in the United States Are More Sick Than Those Abroad, Study Says

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:30s - Published
Men in the United States Are More Sick Than Those Abroad, Study Says

Men in the United States Are More Sick Than Those Abroad, Study Says

Men in the United States Are More Sick, Than Those Abroad, Study Says.

ABC News reports American men are more sick and prone to die earlier than men in other developed countries, a new study finds.

The report, published by The Commonwealth Fund, studied men's health in 11 developed nations.

Researchers found rates of avoidable death, chronic illness and mental health issues are highest in men in the United States.

Nearly 29% of American men reported multiple chronic illnesses.

In Australia, 25% of men reported multiple chronic conditions.

.

Male residents of France and Norway reported the lowest amount of multiple conditions at 17%.

Whether it's stubbornness, an aversion to appearing weak or vulnerable, or other reasons, men go to the doctor far less than women do.

, Authors of study on men's health from The Commonwealth Fund, via ABC News.

American men also experience avoidable deaths or deaths before age 75 at a higher rate than any other country.

As the United States is the only industrialized nation without access to universal health care.

Low-income males are less likely to regularly visit a doctor or be able to afford adequate healthcare.

Roughly 16 million U.S. men are without health insurance and affordability is the reason that people most often cite for why they do not enroll in a health plan.

, Authors of study on men's health from The Commonwealth Fund, via ABC News


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