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First US Death Attributed to Monkeypox Is Recorded in LA County

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
First US Death Attributed to Monkeypox Is Recorded in LA County

First US Death Attributed to Monkeypox Is Recorded in LA County

First US Death Attributed to Monkeypox , Is Recorded in LA County.

First US Death Attributed to Monkeypox , Is Recorded in LA County.

The LA County Department of Public Health announced the death on Sept.

12.

The death attributed to monkeypox was confirmed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The immune system of the person who died reportedly was already significantly weakened.

In a press release, the CDC reiterated that "persons severely immunocompromised who suspect they have monkeypox" should seek sustained medical care.

.

Nearly 22,000 cases of monkeypox have been confirmed in the U.S. .

Deaths due to the virus are rare.

Officials with the World Health Organization (WHO) say that the spread of the virus appears to be slowing.

We're continuing to see a downward trend in Europe, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, via CNN.

However, the WHO Director-General also cautioned that in the Americas the downward trend could be due to the stigma attached to the disease.

While reported cases from the Americas also declined last week, it's harder to draw firm conclusions about the epidemic in that region.

, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, via CNN.

Some countries in the Americas continue to report increasing number of cases ... , Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, via CNN.

... and in some there is likely to be underreporting due to stigma and discrimination or a lack of information for those who need it most, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, via CNN.

Officials warn that a drop in cases can be dangerous if such trends lead to "complacency.".

A downward trend can be the most dangerous time if it opens the door to complacency, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General, via CNN


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