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Global Anti-Smoking Campaigns Continue Despite New Zealand Reversal

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
Global Anti-Smoking Campaigns Continue Despite New Zealand Reversal

Global Anti-Smoking Campaigns Continue Despite New Zealand Reversal

Global Anti-Smoking Campaigns Continue , Despite New Zealand Reversal.

BBC reports that New Zealand's decision to scrap its landmark smoking ban may represent a setback for global anti-smoking campaigns.

In the United Kingdom, Rishi Sunak is looking to create a "smoke-free generation," where anyone under the age of 14 will never be able to legally buy any tobacco product.

According to data from Cancer Research, nine in ten people claim they started smoking before reaching the age of 21.

The strict policy is believed to have been inspired by a similar crackdown in New Zealand preventing anyone born after 2008 from purchasing tobacco products.

The sweeping legislation also limited where tobacco could be sold and reduced the amount of nicotine that products could contain.

However, New Zealand's new government, which was voted into power in October of 2023, are moving to repeal the law.

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BBC reports that countries around the world still have plans for raising "smoke-free generations.".

Mexico currently has some of the world's strictest anti-smoking laws, including bans at beaches, parks and even some private homes.

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Canada has announced plans to cut tobacco use nationwide to under 5% by the year 2035.

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Earlier this year, Canada became the first country to require health warnings printed on individual cigarettes.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that smoking bans in public places, workplaces and public transport are in place for over 25% of the world's population.

The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that smoking bans in public places, workplaces and public transport are in place for over 25% of the world's population


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