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Solar Maximum Could Reveal Secrets of the Sun

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
Solar Maximum Could Reveal Secrets of the Sun

Solar Maximum Could Reveal Secrets of the Sun

Solar Maximum , Could Reveal Secrets of the , Sun.

'The Independent' reports that an upcoming period of increased solar activity could help scientists understand some lingering uncertainties about the Sun.

The imminent "solar maximum" means that our star is currently spewing gamma rays, the highest energy form of light.

Gamma ray numbers are far higher than scientists ever expected.

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The intense stream of energetic solar emissions offers scientists a better understanding of gamma rays, including where they come from.

We have found results that challenge our current understanding of the Sun and its environment, Elena Orlando, co-author of the study from the University of Trieste, INFN, and Stanford University, via 'The Independent'.

We demonstrated a strong correlation of the asymmetry in the solar gamma-ray emission in coincidence with the solar magnetic field flip, which has revealed a possible link among solar astronomy, particle physics, and plasma physics, Elena Orlando, co-author of the study from the University of Trieste, INFN, and Stanford University, via 'The Independent'.

We demonstrated a strong correlation of the asymmetry in the solar gamma-ray emission in coincidence with the solar magnetic field flip, which has revealed a possible link among solar astronomy, particle physics, and plasma physics, Elena Orlando, co-author of the study from the University of Trieste, INFN, and Stanford University, via 'The Independent'.

Currently, leading theories include that gamma rays are connected to solar flares and coronal mass ejections or potentially linked to changes in the Sun's magnetic configuration.

'The Independent' reports that a better understanding could improve the physics models used to predict solar activity.

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Those models are used to make predictions that protect vital instruments in orbit around the planet.

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Scientists have warned that increased solar activity has the potential to cause significant damage to Earth's technology and infrastructure.

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The team's findings were described in an article published by 'The Astrophysical Journal.'


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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published
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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published

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Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published

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University of Trieste Public university in Trieste, Italy


Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Italian research institute