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Boeing's Starliner Set to Make Third Attempt at First-Ever Human Spaceflight

Video Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories - Duration: 01:31s - Published
Boeing's Starliner Set to Make Third Attempt at First-Ever Human Spaceflight

Boeing's Starliner Set to Make Third Attempt at First-Ever Human Spaceflight

Boeing's Starliner , Set to Make Third Attempt at , First-Ever Human Spaceflight.

On June 5, a pair of NASA astronauts will take part in Boeing's CST-100 Starliner's third attempt at accomplishing its first human spaceflight.

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'Orlando Sentinel' reports that NASA's Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams have twice climbed on board the Starliner in the last month.

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'Orlando Sentinel' reports that NASA's Butch Wilmore and Suni Williams have twice climbed on board the Starliner in the last month.

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However, both of those launch attempts were scrapped at the last minute.

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The most recent failed attempt came on June 1, and was abandoned within four minutes of liftoff after an issue with ULA's computer system forced the mission to be scrubbed.

The most recent failed attempt came on June 1, and was abandoned within four minutes of liftoff after an issue with ULA's computer system forced the mission to be scrubbed.

The next attempt is scheduled for 10:52 a.m.

From Cape Canaveral Space Force Station’s Space Launch Complex 41.

According to Space Launch Delta 45's weather squadron forecast, there is a 90% chance of favorable weather conditions for the highly anticipated launch.

The first launch attempt on May 6, was scrubbed due to a faulty valve on the ULA rocket's upper Centaur stage, which has since been replaced.

'Orlando Sentinel' reports that both Boeing and NASA also signed off on a small helium leak on Starliner’s propulsion module that was ultimately not addressed.

'Orlando Sentinel' reports that both Boeing and NASA also signed off on a small helium leak on Starliner’s propulsion module that was ultimately not addressed.

Following a successful launch, the crew will spend just over 24 hours traveling to the International Space Station where they will stay for about eight days.

The crew is then scheduled to return to Earth via a landing in the desert in the southwestern United States


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