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On GPS: Would the US come to Taiwan's defense?

Video Credit: Bleacher Report AOL - Duration: 08:22s - Published
On GPS: Would the US come to Taiwan's defense?

On GPS: Would the US come to Taiwan's defense?

Council on Foreign Relations President Richard Haass and Stanford’s Oriana Skylar Mastro discuss America’s Taiwan policy.

Richard & Fareed then reflect on the legacy of the late Gen.

Colin Powell.


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Taiwan Taiwan Country in East Asia

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Stanford University Stanford University University in California, United States

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