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WATCH: China rings in the Year of the Rabbit with most COVID-19 rules lifted

Video Credit: euronews (in English) - Duration: 02:00s - Published
WATCH: China rings in the Year of the Rabbit with most COVID-19 rules lifted

WATCH: China rings in the Year of the Rabbit with most COVID-19 rules lifted

The Spring Festival, or the Lunar New Year, is China's most important festival and traditionally sees people across the country return to their hometowns for family reunions.


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Chinese New Year Chinese New Year Traditional Chinese holiday

Watch: Parisians celebrate Chinese Lunar New Year and the Year of the Rabbit [Video]

Watch: Parisians celebrate Chinese Lunar New Year and the Year of the Rabbit

A colourful parade ushered in the Chinese Lunar New Year in Paris. It's the Year of the Rabbit and sees the return of public festivities in the French capital after a break since 2019 due to Covid-19.

Credit: euronews (in English)    Duration: 01:00Published
Traditional Foods for Chinese New Year 2023 [Video]

Traditional Foods for Chinese New Year 2023

Traditional Foods for , Chinese New Year 2023. In honor of the Year of the Rabbit, , here are some traditional Chinese foods to help you celebrate. 1. , Dumplings. Dumplings must be arranged in a line as a symbol of life moving in a direction instead of in circles. It is believed that the more dumplings you eat, the more money you can make in the New Year. 2. , Nian Gao. When eating this glutinous rice cake, it is customary to say, “Getting higher year-after-year by year,” meaning life will improve. . 3. , Sweet Rice Balls. The shape of this food is associated with reuniting and being together. 4. , Fish. Crucian carp, Chinese mud carp and Catfish are said to bring good luck, good fortune and surplus, respectively. It must be carefully positioned on the dinner table, face distinguished guests or elders and be the last dish left on the table with leftovers. 5, Steamed Chicken. Symbolizing family, the chicken is typically first offered to ancestors for blessings and protection. If eating in a traditionally Chinese environment for the New Year, there is also dining etiquette to keep in mind:. 1. Don't stick your chopstick into a bowl of rice. 2. It's also frowned upon to tap your bowl with chopsticks. 3. Don't pass food with your chopsticks, and never start eating before your host

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:30Published
The Traditions of Chinese New Year [Video]

The Traditions of Chinese New Year

The Traditions of Chinese New Year. Chinese New Year, also known as Lunar New Year or Spring Festival, marks the start of the year in many Asian cultures. The date falls on the second new moon after the winter solstice on December 21 and is typically celebrated between January 21 and February 20. This year, the Year of the Rabbit, kicks off on January 22. Here’s a look at some of the festival's oldest traditions. Red is the main color of the festival, The color is viewed as auspicious and can be seen in many decorations. Family reunion dinners are held on New Year’s Eve, The menu usually consists of fish for prosperity, dumplings for wealth and glutinous rice cakes for successful careers. Firecrackers and fireworks are a must, It’s a tradition to light firecrackers and fireworks in the first minute of the new year. Families exchange gifts, The most common gift is the red envelope, which contains money and signifies luck

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:15Published
‘Black Panther 2’ & ‘Ant-Man 3‘ Secure China Release Dates as Beijing Lifts Ban on Marvel | THR News [Video]

‘Black Panther 2’ & ‘Ant-Man 3‘ Secure China Release Dates as Beijing Lifts Ban on Marvel | THR News

The tentpoles, both releasing in China in February after Chinese New Year, will be the first Marvel/Disney releases in the world's second-largest theatrical market since 'Avengers: Endgame' in 2019.

Credit: The Hollywood Reporter    Duration: 01:29Published

Rabbit (zodiac) Rabbit (zodiac) Sign of the Chinese zodiac

8 Chinese New Year Superstitions [Video]

8 Chinese New Year Superstitions

8 Chinese New Year , Superstitions. According to chinatravel.com, there are some dos and don'ts during the New Year festival. Here are some common Chinese New Year superstitions. 1. Don't sweep, Otherwise, the wealth brought by the gods for the New Year may be swept away. 2. Don't wash clothes for the first two days, You could wash away good fortune, as the first day of the celebration is the birthday of the water god. 3. Don't break anything, Breaking things, especially dishes, is considered a bad omen since you are severing your connection to prosperity and good luck. 4. Don't use unlucky words, Negative words such as "death" or "poverty" should be avoided at all costs. 5. No medicine or hospital visits, Unless there is a serious emergency, doing so could bring illness for the coming year. 5. No medicine or hospital visits, Unless there is a serious emergency, doing so could bring illness for the coming year. 6. No lending or borrowing, Doing so will result in lending or borrowing for the rest of the year. 7. Don't use scissors or knives, Cutting hair is also considered taboo until the festival is over. 8. Don't eat porridge or meat, Porridge is considered peasant food, so eating it will keep you from prosperity. Refraining from eating meat in the morning shows respect to the gods who arrive to welcome the new year. 8. Don't eat porridge or meat, Porridge is considered peasant food, so eating it will keep you from prosperity. Refraining from eating meat in the morning shows respect to the gods who arrive to welcome the new year. Good Luck in the Year of the Rabbit!

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published

Lunar New Year Lunar New Year Beginning of a year in a lunar calendar

WATCH: Celebrations mark the end of the Lunar New Year in Taiwan [Video]

WATCH: Celebrations mark the end of the Lunar New Year in Taiwan

Celebrations mark the end of the Lunar New Year in Taiwan.

Credit: euronews (in English)    Duration: 01:00Published
Monterey Park Mayor Suggests Motive Behind Deadly Lunar New Year Shooting [Video]

Monterey Park Mayor Suggests Motive Behind Deadly Lunar New Year Shooting

Monterey Park Mayor , Suggests Motive Behind Deadly , Lunar New Year Shooting. On January 21, ten people were killed and another ten were injured after a gunman opened fire at a California dance studio amid Lunar New Year celebrations. On January 21, ten people were killed and another ten were injured after a gunman opened fire at a California dance studio amid Lunar New Year celebrations. NBC reports that the mayor of Monterey Park said that the gunman in the deadly Lunar New Year shooting may have been targeting his wife. NBC reports that the mayor of Monterey Park said that the gunman in the deadly Lunar New Year shooting may have been targeting his wife. According to Monterey Park Mayor Henry Lo, the shooter's ex-wife was believed to have been at the Star Ballroom Dance Studio at the time of the shooting. According to Monterey Park Mayor Henry Lo, the shooter's ex-wife was believed to have been at the Star Ballroom Dance Studio at the time of the shooting. While speaking with NBC, Lo said that the shooter, identified by authorities as Huu Can Tran, appeared to have a "history of domestic violence.". While speaking with NBC, Lo said that the shooter, identified by authorities as Huu Can Tran, appeared to have a "history of domestic violence.". NBC reports that authorities are now probing the background of the 72-year-old suspect who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. NBC reports that authorities are now probing the background of the 72-year-old suspect who died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. We understand our community is looking for answers, Henry Lo, Monterey Park Mayor, via NBC. NBC reports that in neighboring Alhambra, another shooting occurred at a dance hall just shortly after the shooting in Monterey Park. . NBC reports that in neighboring Alhambra, another shooting occurred at a dance hall just shortly after the shooting in Monterey Park. . According to authorities, evidence found in the suspect's car linked him to both crime scenes. . Los Angeles County Sheriff Robert Luna said that the motive in the deadly shootings remains unclear. We don’t know if this is specifically a hate crime defined by law, but who walks into a dance hall and guns down 20 people? The description we have now is of a male Asian. Does that matter? I don’t know. I can tell you that everything’s on the table, Robert Luna, Los Angeles County Sheriff, via NBC. We don’t know if this is specifically a hate crime defined by law, but who walks into a dance hall and guns down 20 people? The description we have now is of a male Asian. Does that matter? I don’t know. I can tell you that everything’s on the table, Robert Luna, Los Angeles County Sheriff, via NBC

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published
Delicious Desserts to Try This Lunar New Year [Video]

Delicious Desserts to Try This Lunar New Year

Delicious Desserts to Try , This Lunar New Year . Lunar New Year takes place on Jan. 22. . Here are some desserts 'Delish' promises will make the day extra sweet. Ube crinkle cookies, Ube extract and ube halaya will kick your average crinkle cookie up a notch!. Mochi, This chewy rice treat goes great with a matcha hot chocolate or green tea. Tang Yuan: Glutinous Rice Balls, This treat represents familial unity and is typically eaten on the 15th day of the Lunar New Year. Mango Sticky Rice, This dish is coated in a warm coconut sauce. Dalgona Candy, This Korean street snack was made popular by 'Squid Game.'. Homemade Mooncakes, A variety of fillings include red bean, lotus seed, black sesame, fruit and nuts. Mochi Donuts, The Japanese mochi and American donut come together to create a delightfully delectable dessert

Credit: Wibbitz Top Stories    Duration: 01:31Published

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China rings in Lunar New Year with most Covid rules lifted

With the easing of most Covid-19 restrictions, many people could finally make their first trip back...
IndiaTimes - Published